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Dating violence in two high school samples discriminating variables

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Dating aggression is a prevalent and costly public health concern.

Using a relational risk framework, this study examined acute and chronic relational risk factors (negative interactions, jealousy, support, and relationship satisfaction) and their effects on physical and psychological dating aggression.

During this developmental period, victimization and perpetration are highly correlated and most often co-occur (O’Leary & Slep, 2003; Whitaker, Haileyesus, Swahn, & Saltzman, 2007; Williams et al., 2008); thus, it is best to examine them together.

Importantly, a relational risk framework of dating aggression is consistent with the idea that risk for dating aggression is not static, and that individuals may be at higher risk at some times than at other times.

Taken together, these findings provide support for the role of relational risk factors for dating aggression.

They also underscore the importance of considering risk dynamically.

It has been shown to be a consistent predictor of dating aggression (O’Keefe, 2005), and is thought to be the most proximal relational risk factor preceding aggression (Riggs & O’Leary, 1989).

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Instead, they proposed an extension to Rigg’s and O’Leary’s theory of dating aggression such that risk factors are organized into three components: background risk factors (e.g., individual psychopathology), immediate situational risk factors (e.g., stress levels), and relational risk factors (e.g., relationship satisfaction).Although much research has been done, the literature has been critiqued for often being atheoretical (Shorey, Cornelius, & Bell, 2008), focusing primarily on individual risk factors, and not sufficiently considering relational risk factors (i.e., the characteristics of the relationship, such as satisfaction) (Reese-Weber & Johnson, 2013).Relational risk factors are theorized to increase risk for aggression by intensifying the frequency and severity of conflict situations (Riggs & O’Leary, 1989).For example, if individuals are very jealous regarding a specific partner’s behaviors, they may be at greater risk at that time. For example, some individuals may typically be more jealous than others, placing them at greater risk over the course of time.Finally, if risk is indeed dynamic, we might expect interactions between chronic and acute risk.Using a relational risk framework, this study examined acute and chronic relational risk factors (negative interactions, jealousy, support, & relationship satisfaction) and their effects on physical and psychological dating aggression.